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Tuesday, March 18th, 2014

Last Day to Save on Pablo, Kartell and Vitra

DesignPublic.com

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Hey Everyone, Just wanted to let you know that if you’ve been considering purchasing from Pablo, Kartell or Vitra, today is the day to pull the trigger. The sale ends at midnight.

Warning: The following items and savings may tempt you ….

The Vitra New Panton Chair, down to $263.50 from $310. This contemporary classic adds a sleek touch to an eclectic mix, fits in seamlessly with super-modern rooms and slides its way right under a rustic reclaimed wood dining table. It’s glam at a dressing table and perks up a desk.

The Kartell Bubble Club Armchair slashed down to $612 from $720. These bring the library/family room club chair silhouette to an unexpected place — outdoors! Remember how James Spader and William Shatner used to sit in these and have a cigar at the end of Boston Legal every week?

The Pablo Lim 360 Task Lamp down to $255 from $300. I love this lamp because it’s very futuristic looking and sleek, yet the charm of the base gives it a touch of that retro ’70s paneling appeal. The balance between the pieces is pleasing and playful.

Speaking of playful, George Nelson’s iconic mid-century modern clocks are on sale too; this Ball Clock is down to $331.50 from $390. These are functional works of art you’ll not only treasure for life, but pass down as a prized possession.

So what are you waiting for? Hop on over to the sales and make up your mind before the clock strikes midnight!

SHOP THE SALES:

Shop all Pablo
Shop all Kartell
Shop all Vitra

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Friday, October 4th, 2013

Renzo Piano’s Minimalist Cabin

Becky

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The Vitra campus in Weil am Rhein, Germany is unlike any other – you probably recognize VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron:

The latest addition to its architecture collection is Diogene, a minimalist cabin designed by Renzo Piano and The Renzo Piano Building Workshop (RPBW). The house represents a unique partnership between the architect and the furniture company, and makes you wonder just how few square feet you could get by living in.

While known for so many large iconic projects, tiny houses have always been a big interest of Piano’s. The planning of the Diogene, which has a footprint of just 2.4 meters by 2.4 meters, was ten years in the making. When Vitra caught wind of the fact that he needed a partner, they made a big but logical from furniture into the minimalist house market.

While they still play with the idea of if and how to put the very functional little house into production, the prototype sits nestled in the grass on Vitra’s campus. The house collects its own water and supplies its own electricity – you could go completely off the grid in this small home, which has Photovoltaic cells and solar modules, a rainwater tank, a biological toilet, natural ventilation and triple-glazed windows.

The large openings on the roof and the large window open it up, let in the light and make it feel a lot larger than a few dozen square feet, making such small-space living not only tolerable, but comfortable. The sofa folds out into a bed, and there is a tiny bathroom and kitchen inside. The little house can serve as a Thoreau-like retreat, a studio, a guest house or a place to get some solitude and peace just outside of a busy household. It could also be used as emergency housing after natural disasters. I can only hope it’s something we can sell someday!

SHOP ALL VITRA

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Thursday, October 11th, 2012

Get To Know Vitra

Becky

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People, we’re having a sale on all things Vitra for the next week (through Oct. 18, 2012). In honor of that, let’s take a look at some of Vitra’s iconic products.

Vitra produces George Nelson’s mid-century modern clock designs. This is the Sunburst Clock, but there is a slew of diverse designs to choose from.

These are Panton Chairs, also known as “S Chairs” – designed by Vernor Panton back in the sixties. They come in lots of yummy colors. If you’ve been waiting to pull the trigger on some of these, do it this week while you can save 15%.

In addition to the cutest product shot ever, we have the Eames Elephant. The prototype was designed by Charles and Ray Eames back in 1945, and was rendered in plywood. Vitra actually put it into production over 60 years later, this time in polypropylene.

This is Jasper Morrison’s Cork Stool. There are three different shapes to choose from. I like them because they are so versatile – you can tuck them underneath a console table as extra seating in a tight space, use them to hold a table lamp and cocktails as a side table, or just enjoy them as sculpture.

Sori Yanagi’s designed this Butterfly Stool in 1954. I feel calmer just looking at it.

This is a thick composition of Vitra’s Algue. These are plastic pieces that snap together to form anything from small sculptural wall hangings to thick, vine-like screens.

Finally, take a virtual visit to Vitra’s campus in Weil am Rhein, Germany. My favorite building is Vitrahaus and Lounge Chair Atelier by Herzog & de Meuron, which received a ton of buzz when it first went up back in 2010.

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Tuesday, January 26th, 2010

Around the Web: Modern House Notes

Becky

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Oh, and speaking of Modern Lincoln Logs, check out the new Vitra Museum building by Herzog & de Meuron. First we had a bunch of Jenga architecture, and now everywhere I look I see Lincoln Logs.

I spied this over at Modern House Notes, and they spied it over at Architecture Lab:

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Thursday, July 30th, 2009

Green Tip & Product of the Week

Becky

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So, what lazy green thing have I been up to this week? I signed up to follow AltUse on facebook. That way, when they tell me some wacky way to reuse something or a new way to use something simple and organic and it’s not crazy, it will stick in my head and I’ll waste less. It doesn’t really get much lazier than simply following something on Facebook, does it? I never claimed I was a go-getter.

Also, I really loved this article over at Styleture about Sustainable Interior Design. Check it out here.

Now, for the sustainable product of the week….drumroll please…

I LOVE the Vitra Cork Stools. I love that there are three shapes, though I kinda wish there were four, just to even things out. The top one reminds me of fungi, and the bottom two remind me of chess pieces. I think it would be really cute to have two pairs of them around a kids table, since they are only 13″ high. This is also good coffee table height, and end table height if they are next to a low modern sofa or daybed. I have to say, the pricetag forces me to think of these more like functional art in the form of sculpture, but when I pick my favorite products, I have no budget constraints holding me back.

So what makes these eco-friendly? Cork. Cork is a natural product harvested from trees in the Mediterranean basin of Spain and Portugal. While many people think cork is a new technology, it has actually been used for thousands of years. Unlike hardwood, the useful part of a cork tree is the bark, not the lumber of the tree itself. Cork is only retrieved from mature cork trees and is limited to being harvested in 9 year cycles so that the same tree can harvested for generations making it an environmentally friendly resource

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