Visit our other brands: danishdesignstore.com, adogslife.net

Wednesday, October 24th, 2012

Bringing Up The Barn

Becky

Posted by Becky | View all posts by Becky
4 Comments »

I remember looking for a house with my parents when I was a teenager – one of my favorites was a converted 19th century dairy barn. The center of the first floor had a two-story volume, with a balcony all around it that led to the bedrooms around the perimeter of the second floor. Everything had been painted white. The whole house had the feeling of a rustic gallery. It was super cool and supremely impractical for our family, but it’s stuck with me. Thus, I felt like seeking out some converted barns to share with you today.

Converting a barn can help preserve not only the building but also the feel of the agrarian landscape. These are treasures that all too often are left to rot and fall apart. Here are som wonderful examples of barns-turned-homes for people:

This one is from Colonial Barn Restoration Inc.

The way they converted the large barn door into an entryway with side lites and a transom is especially clever.

Original rustic beams, wood siding and doors keep the feeling of the old barn alive.

Another great thing about barns is that they have tons of space for things like basketball and racquetball courts.

This barn by Kissling Architecture in Fredericksburg, Texas has been converted into a gorgeous ranch house. It’s remarkable how the massing has such modern lines:

The original stone adds so much patina and history, both inside and out:

The way simple, vernacular lines of buildings like barns, built for form over function, compare to the clean lines and simplicity of modern architecture is quite striking. This is especially apparent in this rustic-meets-modern project by Aldridge & Tanno Architects:

Share

Friday, July 3rd, 2009

Facebook Faves on Fridays

Becky

Posted by Becky | View all posts by Becky
2 Comments »

Alright, I’ve gone a little bit off the flickr grid – my friend Lucia just posted some absolutely gorgeous photos of Best Farm on her facebook page and I wanted to share them. I believe her husband Brian took these and I felt compared to share:

Is there anything more beautiful than these simple American vernacular buildings?

I tried to research Best Farm online and found this shot. The property became part of the National Park Service in 1993, and I think this building is the same one shown above:

Does anyone know anymore about the preservation and restoration of this site? I believe it was a Civil War Battlefield in Maryland.

first two photos property of Lucia and Brian Hall. Last photo taken from here.

Share