Visit our other brands: danishdesignstore.com, adogslife.net

Monday, September 16th, 2013

Touring the Old Fourth Ward

Becky

Posted by Becky | View all posts by Becky
Leave a comment!

Loft, bungalows, modern houses, the Beltline, new parks, Martin Luther King’s birthplace, fabulous restaurants, funky shops … they all come together in Atlanta’s Old Fourth Ward, a historic area that’s becoming one of the city’s favorites. This Sunday a handful of residents opened their doors and let us into their homes for a Fall in the 4th Ward home tour and it was fantastic.

Our tour began at a former cotton warehouse in Studioplex. In the courtyard, you can see the old metal doors and structure of the second story, which has been opened up (it’s also open to the sky, so balconies that look out here are great bonus areas). Here we saw three very different ways people are living in these true lofts. One was a one-room full of amazing artwork and custom furniture, another had added a second story loft bedroom and rents the space out for events, the third was a wide-open artist’s live-work studio with 15 foot ceilings. Here’s a look at that one.

One of my favorite things about this space was that the owner had separated her bedroom with a clear glass wall and installed this stained glass window. On the other side is the media area complete with built-in shelves around the window.

The owner is also an architect, which explained how she designed this beautiful kitchen:

The cabinets were rough wood with stainless steel cabinets; the kitchen island has a beautiful patina. The open shelves were artfully arranged, and the pantry, complete with antique pie safe, was stunning:

A few blocks away we toured through this beautiful modern home by TaC Studios:

This home is Earthcraft certified and sustainable elements include a 500 gallon rain cistern. It’s located near the new Beltline East Side Trail and it’s scale respects the other homes in the neighborhood. While compact, the interiors are open and airy, and make it feel like a much larger house inside. Connections to the yard through doors to the dipping pool courtyard and the master bedroom balcony open the living space to the outdoors.

Finally, we came upon a once-derelict bungalow that had been rehabbed and sold by an architect neighbor. You know, when you see that a lot of architects are flocking to a particular neighborhood, it’s an early sign of transition. It’s amazing to see this neighborhood now compared to what it was like when I first toured the area about six years ago.

The lovely blue door was an indicator of what to expect inside. The architect made the most of the small 2-bedroom, 1-bath home, and the owner has an amazing eye for mixing eclectic pieces.

The living room opens into the kitchen, which also incorporates the dining table. Sorry my shots do not do the beautiful home justice.

Did you attend the tour? If so, which house was your favorite?

For more, check us out on Instagram!

Photos of the modern house courtesy of TaC Studios Architecture. All other photos by Becky Harris.

Share

Wednesday, July 10th, 2013

5 Spectacular Bridge Houses

Becky

Posted by Becky | View all posts by Becky
4 Comments »

The idea of a home spanning a valley, creek, crevasse, what have you, is fascinating to me. While we’re all familiar with the jutting cantilever  over the falls at Fallingwater, there are other ways to span flowing waters and valleys. Intrepid architects have attempted this with different styles combined with feats of engineering, creating bridge houses. Here’s a look at some of the most stunning examples around today.

photo by Sam Noonan

This Bridge House is by Max Pritchard Architect, built in 2008. This home is located in Adelaide, Australia and spans a winter creek that babbles along well beneath its floors.

photo by Sam Noonan

photo by Christiaan de Bruijne

This villa in the Dutch Achterhoek was designed by 123DV Architecture and completed in 2011, and is totally self sustainable. Its long horizontal lines suit the park around it.

Taking a step back in time to a mid-century precedent bridge house – this is the Warner House, built in 1958 in New Canaan, Connecticut. I believe I featured it years ago when it was on the market and it was featured on the Modern House Notes blog. The home was designed by John M. Johansen.

Photo via Studio Green Landscape Architecture

This architect of this beautiful home, Stanley Saitowitz | Natoma Architects, decided to place this house in a valley instead of on a hilltop in Marin County, California, fitting into the landscape yet contrasting with it via its strong lines and Corten steel panels that will patina over time. The house, completed in 2005, has elegant heft yet treads lightly on the land. The surrounding landscape is by Studio Green Landscape Architecture. Winter creeks travel underneath the home seasonally.

photo by Curt Clayton

Architect Wilfred John Oskar designed this stunning bridge house in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and it was completed in 2008. The modern structure makes the most of the views of the surrounding bucolic landscape and natural light.

photo by Curt Clayton

Would you live in a bridge house? If so, where would your ideal location for it be?

Share

Friday, January 28th, 2011

Flickr Faves on Fridays: A Mod Modular

Becky

Posted by Becky | View all posts by Becky
2 Comments »

kitHAUS K1+K2, Santa Barbara

I couldn’t help but notice the new additions to our Fresh New Spaces Group from kitHAUS.

kitHAUS K1+K2, Santa Barbara

It made me want to know more about this project, like is it prefab? What green technologies were used? What is the rest of the context of the site? So I popped on over to their website, and recognized their smaller shed instantly, I know I’ve been in one a few times at different shows and exhibitions and such. This house is so much bigger – kitHAUS, we want to know more; you teased us by adding this to the flickr group, now come chat with us about how these modules are designed and how you put them together!

Share

Monday, July 20th, 2009

The Cardinal House

Becky

Posted by Becky | View all posts by Becky
12 Comments »

I was in Cincinnati for 48 hours last week and while I didn’t get a chance to check out the exhibit of his newly found paintings at Fabulous Frames, I stumbled upon this remarkable house while checking out a river view house for sale in Anderson Township. I suppose the street sign before the shared driveway should have given me a clue as to what was ahead:

There was another Charley Harper cardinal on the other side of the house in the carport. Those decks have a great view of the Ohio River and the rolling bluegrass hills of Kentucky on the other side.

By the way, this is the house nearby that my friends and I want to make our dream house when we win the lottery and retire:

Share

Tuesday, July 7th, 2009

Architecture on Twitter

Becky

Posted by Becky | View all posts by Becky
4 Comments »

I admit it, I am a relative newbie to Twitter, even though Design Public has been tweeting for quite some time. Who are your favorite design tweeps that I might like to follow? Today I found this cool Mexican house, via styleture via freshome, designed by 7X Taller de Arquitectura.

At first glance, I thought this might be cargotecture, i.e. a house made of shipping containers, because of the shape of the second floor on the right side. I wonder if the forms created by making buildings out of shipping containers is starting to influence the style and form of buildings that contain no containers? Or is it a coincidence? Do you think the style gleaned more inspiration from international style and designers like Rem Koolhaas (I’m thinking Villa Dall’ava) or Corbu (I’m thinking a little Villa Savoye)?  Is it a combo? Am I the world’s worst architecture analyst? In any case, I’d love to see an inspiration board for this very interesting modern house. What do you think?

photos via freshome

Share