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Monday, June 2nd, 2014

Sale! Kartell and Magis 15% off This Week

DesignPublic.com

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We know now that the weather is warm that you may be lacking some cool yet comfy outdoor furniture. So we’ve slashed prices on outdoor selections from Kartell and Magis. The Kartell sale runs through June 8, 2014 and the Magis sale runs through June 9, 2014. Completely outfit your space or fill in a hole with a settee, sofa, armchair, lounge chair or bistro table and dining chairs. Here’s a few of the highlights from the sale to tempt you. And P.S., many of these items work just as well indoors too!

Kartell Bubble Armchair

Cozy up like James Spader and William Shatner used to at the end of every episode of Boston Legal in this new classic, the playful Kartell Bubble Armchair. Price is slashed from $800 to $680 now through June 8, 2014. The Bubble also comes in a sofa version.

Kartell Magic Hole Sofa

For a more streamlined look, consider the Kartell Magic Hole Sofa. This is a wonderful piece to set out on the front porch for curb appeal, waving to neighbors and watching the world go by. It also will give a hint to your modern and/or contemporary interior from the street. Currently on sale for $935 from $1100 through June 8, 2014.

Magis Table One Bistro, Outdoor

Make dining al fresco a breeze with this modern bistro table from Magis. It comes in a square top or round top version and comes in table height and high-top table height. It’s been marked down from $999 to $849.15 now through June 9, 2014.

Magis Chair One, Concrete Base

Pair the table height with a pair or two of the Magis Chair Ones, now on sale from $1378 to $1171.30 for two, now through June 9, 2014. Choose from red, black or white.

Magis Paso Doble Chaise Lounge

For a more relaxed pose, treat yourself to a Magis Paso Doble Chaise Lounge. This curved silhouette means you’ll be comfy reading a book, chatting over frozen cocktails or just soaking up some rays. On sale from $1979 to $1682.15 through June 9, 2014.

There are plenty more items to tempt you for the rest of the week.

Shop the Kartell sale

Shop the Magis sale

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Tuesday, August 27th, 2013

Five Must-Have Dining Chairs

Becky

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I’m a chair nut. When I moved, my moving men kept putting every single side chair I owned into my dining room, their permanent locations, T.B.D. By the time the dining room table arrived, there wasn’t any room to put it in the sea of chairs. Remarkably, they all found a spot, as I love an occasional chair here or there and don’t really tend toward matchy-matchy sets.

Anyway, from one chair nut to others or potential others, here are chairs to be on the lookout for at yard sales and chairs to invest in for your permanent (museum-ish yet functional) collection. I’m going to stick to five dining chairs as otherwise we’d be here all day and I have other stuff to do, but it’s a solid start.

1. Anything by Thonet, particularly with bent wood. These date back to the mid-century. Of the 19th century, that is, somewhere ’round ever-stylin’ Vienna. They still look fly today. Love. Scour second-hand websites and yard sales. A Thonet is a great score.

2. The Emeco Navy Chair (1006 Chair). These chairs were built to stand up to violent seas and dudes in the Navy. We’re talking torpedo blasts on the side of a destroyer. Not only are these suckers strong, they have classic mid-century industrial style that will never fade.

3. The Hans Wegner Wishbone Chair (1949). This versatile chair adds warmth and style to many different kinds of dining rooms. Though first impulse is to go all Danish modern around it, it works very well in more traditional spaces, spaces with Asian style, eclectic rooms as well as very minimalist rooms.

4. Arne Jacobsen’s Series 7 Chair (1955). Re-released, this classic is often imitated by chain stores and catalogs – don’t fall for the imitations; having a licensed chair is worth the investment. This versatile and curvy little number looks great for formal dining, casual eat-in kitchen dining and at a desk or dressing table.

5. The Kartell Masters Chair (2010-ish?). Philippe Starck mashed up the silhouettes of three chairs here – Jacobsen’s Series 7, and two others we didn’t have room to include – Eero Saarinen’s Tulip armchair, and the Eames’ Eiffel Chair to get this meaningful back.

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Friday, February 8th, 2013

Designer Interview: Peter Novague

Becky

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Today were sitting down with Peter Novague, Chief Designer at Novague. Peter is a product designer who has tackled items from tweezers to yachts. Somewhere in between the two lies The Novague Edge Chair – its form was inspired by Japanese origami, though it’s function, comfortable ergonomics, was the priority. 
Do you have any favorite chairs that inspire your designs?
There are many chairs I love for their form, among which I could name those by Eames, Panton or the Bouroullec Brothers (Vitra). For me, however, the key aspect of a chair is whether it is comfortable to sit on and many products don’t meet this standard; the ergonomics aren’t optimal. My flat is full of beautiful chairs, including the T3 by Maarten Van Severen, one of the most interesting pieces I know.

How did you come up with the Edge Chair?
In our small country, a designer like me gets contracts of a very different type. As my primary focus is on the product design, I work on items as varied as glasses or a smartphone. All my past projects were the result of a compromise between my idea and other circumstances (such as the production costs, technological limitations, deadlines, or continuity of the company product line). When I was working on a smartphone, for instance, I could only choose from a limited selection of plastics, and both the connector positions and dimensions were already fixed.

Yet as I’m now able to fund my own projects, I decided to work on a furniture piece and designing a chair seemed to be a challenging and interesting enterprise.

How do the wide array of items you design inform each other? That is to say, how does designing a yacht or a car influence how you design a chair or a smart phone? Are there any universal ideas that cut across all of these areas in your design philosophy?
Certainly. I think daily about why I do design, what I can bring to it, and what it brings to me in return. And it’s always inspiring to meet with company owners, CEOs and executives. I learn a lot from them, and it’s also perhaps what I enjoy the most about my job.
As for my contribution in making a new product, I find myself as a cleaner: I practically remove an idea of its unnecessary parts. I’m playing with the form and content, aiming to produce a natural-looking product. It’s important that in the end, it only consists of what should be there. In other words, while some products are complex sets of parts due to the manufacture and assembly processes, it is the aim of design to consider the product as a whole, something complete and seamless. The final product should be more than a some of its parts.
The second important idea that resonates with me is a kind of respect towards the history of the product and its previous models.
Prague is one of the most beautiful cities in the world; how does it inspire you?
Prague is a splendid place for relaxation at cafés and enjoying the many cultural events it offers. Yet it loses touch with the latest developments in industrial design. In that sense, I’d prefer to have an office in London, New York, or Munich.
What are you working on at Novague right now?
An electric bicycle or a paddle, a typical product of which many people think there’s no more space for further designing and innovation.
Do you have any advice for people who are interested in a career in product design?
Don’t focus on the designers, study the individual products.
What kind of  products do you recommend buying?
Concentrate on things you enjoy. Buying one thing of quality and and keeping it in an empty flat is better than filling one’s life with products that mean a compromise.
Thanks so much to Petr for chatting with us today. Check out The Novague Edge Chair here; check out Novague’s other designs here.
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Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

In Celebration of Bertoia Chairs

Becky

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Those of you who have been reading this blog for awhile know I have a serious chair fetish. While I’d never pick one favorite, Harry Bertoia’s wire chairs are right up there at the tippy top of the list. Thus, I am super-excited that we are now carrying these licensed chairs, made by Knoll. So excited in fact, I thought I’d share the coolest shots of this chair I coud find.

First, let’s get a look at the naked chair:

“If you look at these chairs, they are mainly made of air, like sculpture. Space passes through them” -Harry Bertoia

This is very fitting, as Bertoia was trained as a sculptor.

Here’s the sexiest Bertoia wire shot ever taken:

This is Jocelyn Lane circa 1960, enjoying a Diamond chair poolside. Be warned: If you sit in one with shorts this short on, you will get a waffle pattern on the back of your thighs. You can avoid this by buying a seat cushion, a full cover or wearing pants.

Here is the coolest person who ever sat in a Bertoia Chair:

Laurence Fishburne turning three side chairs into a lounging spot, in Paley Park, which is the coolest pocket park use of Bertoia Chairs.

By the way, all of the Knoll products we carry are 15% off through September 30, 2012. Just use coupon code CLASSIC

*Found a few of these photos on Pinterest and have no idea how to track down the propert credits,  if you know any of them, PLEASE leave it in the comments section so I can add them!

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Tuesday, July 17th, 2012

Hans Wegner and His Wishbone Chairs

Becky

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When I noticed our sister store, Danish Design store, was having a sale (buy five and get a sixth for free) on Hans Wegner’s Wishbone Chairs, my mind started to spin, as I have been coveting them for years. I don’t know if I’d ever be able to pick a style or color as they are so much fun in the bright colors yet so mid-century modern cool in the original finishes, but I dream of having these in my dining room.

Hans J. Wegner was born in 1914 in Denmark. As he matured, it turned out he was the right person in the right place at the right time. He cut his teeth in design and furniture making as a teenager, apprenticing for a master cabinetmaker. He then went on to study furniture making as well as architecture in Copenhagen, where he was inspired by the Carpenters’ Guild Furniture Exhibits.

Wegner continued his education by working under Arne Jacobsen. who is probably best known for designing the Swan Chair and the Egg Chair, which both remain modern icons (personally, my favorite is a vintage Grand Prix chair, but that’s a story for another day):

After developing his style of organic and functional designs, Wegner designed the Wishbone Chair in 1949, during the height of mid-century modern design. The chair has had a major influence on design ever since and is a Danish Modern icon. It works in so many rooms, from a Japanese tea house vibe to very contemporary spaces.

Feast your eyes on the Wishbone in a variety of colors and room styles:

image from Kristen Rivoli Interior Design

Tempted yet? If you are, add 6 to your shopping cart over at Danish Design Store and enter 6FOR5 at checkout.

Most images via The Wishbone Chair Blog; a few at the bottom I ripped from Pinterest and have no idea where they originally came from, which I hate to do, but I had to share them. Please let me know if you know the sources.

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