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Friday, October 4th, 2013

Renzo Piano’s Minimalist Cabin

Becky

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The Vitra campus in Weil am Rhein, Germany is unlike any other – you probably recognize VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron:

The latest addition to its architecture collection is Diogene, a minimalist cabin designed by Renzo Piano and The Renzo Piano Building Workshop (RPBW). The house represents a unique partnership between the architect and the furniture company, and makes you wonder just how few square feet you could get by living in.

While known for so many large iconic projects, tiny houses have always been a big interest of Piano’s. The planning of the Diogene, which has a footprint of just 2.4 meters by 2.4 meters, was ten years in the making. When Vitra caught wind of the fact that he needed a partner, they made a big but logical from furniture into the minimalist house market.

While they still play with the idea of if and how to put the very functional little house into production, the prototype sits nestled in the grass on Vitra’s campus. The house collects its own water and supplies its own electricity – you could go completely off the grid in this small home, which has Photovoltaic cells and solar modules, a rainwater tank, a biological toilet, natural ventilation and triple-glazed windows.

The large openings on the roof and the large window open it up, let in the light and make it feel a lot larger than a few dozen square feet, making such small-space living not only tolerable, but comfortable. The sofa folds out into a bed, and there is a tiny bathroom and kitchen inside. The little house can serve as a Thoreau-like retreat, a studio, a guest house or a place to get some solitude and peace just outside of a busy household. It could also be used as emergency housing after natural disasters. I can only hope it’s something we can sell someday!

SHOP ALL VITRA

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Friday, January 21st, 2011

Flickr Faves of the Week: Hotel OTTO in Berlin

Becky

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This week a group of images in our Fresh New Spaces Group on Flickr caught my attention. They were the minimalist spaces from a boutique hotel in Berlin called Hotel OTTO. Here, the neutral color palette and restrained furnishings let you enjoy the view, the photography and the warm hardwood floors:

Schöne Aussicht von der Frühstücks Lounge im Hotel Otto in Charlottenburg

This simple bedroom contains lots of space saving tips, including using thin but colorful upholstered canvases in lieu of a clunky headboard, and utilizing swing arm sconces to save nightstand space (and of course, when you don’t have room to cram in a nightstand, these are a great solution as well).

Moderne Zimmer im Hotel Otto in der Nähe der Oper Berlin

The palette is kept very simple, letting this iconic Eames fabric get the attention it deserves:

Zimmer im Boutique Hotel Otto in der Nähe vom Savignyplatz in Berlin

However, if a subtle blue, gray and black palette is not for you, they’ve got some electric preppy pink and green options for you. Note the extra shelf on the nightstand, which is great for tucking away books, magazines, and even that annoying glow from a digital clock that can exacerbate an insomniac. They’ve also scooped up some of the floor space with this piece so that you can take some of that stuff out of your suitcase and really get comfortable:

Standard Zimmer im 4 Sterne Hotel Otto in der Nähe vom Kurfürstendamm

Daybed zum Entspannen im Boutique Hotel Otto am Savignyplatz

Thanks so much to Hotel OTTO for sharing these shots with the group! More information about Hotel OTTO

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Thursday, January 8th, 2009

Outfitting a Minimalist Kitchen with Erin from Unclutterer.com

Ali

Posted by Ali | View all posts by Ali
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Erin, Unclutterer.comErin Rooney Doland is Editor-in-Chief of the home and office organizing blog Unclutterer.com.

I live in a mid-century modern home designed by the architect Charles M. Goodman. It is a quirky house with two perpendicular walls made of glass, and the other two walls made of concrete. My friends lovingly refer to it as “1960′s vision of the future.”

Twenty years after the house was built, the then-current homeowner decided to do away with the beautiful metal cabinetry in the kitchen and replace it with plywood and laminate cupboards. To add insult to injury, the redesign included Read the rest of this entry »

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