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Wednesday, May 9th, 2012

Hot Design in Action: Wall Flats at Home

Becky

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Thanks to everyone who has been posting their Design Public goodies in action around their own homes. I love these so much more than retail product shots; it shows how talented you all are and I’m nosy; I love getting a peek into your homes and lives this way. Here are a few ways you all are using Inhabit’s Wall Flats that caught my eye this week:

These Inhabit Wall Flats were posted by Lisa Choules, and because she posted this picture, I am suffering from an acute case of kitchen envy! So clean and white, full of style, and punched with color and mid-mod style in all the right ways. On the far left wall you can see the Drift Wall Flats adding just the right amount of texture, the perfect backdrop for her Nelson Pendant Lamp and Eames Eiffel Base Shell Chairs. Bravo!

Next we have this super hip and energetic nursery posted by Lori, who has used Seesaw Wall Flats to add dimension to the white wall in the room. I love the way she’s balanced white, hardwood floors and that brilliant green, and the birch trees are the perfect finishing touch. Isn’t it amazing how far nursery design has come in the past decade? Babies are growing up hipper than ever!

Want to explore all of the cool Wall Flats designs? Check them out here. Check out all of the Hot Design in Action here.  Want to share your own hot design in action? We don’t ask this without offering up a little enticement: Email us a photo of design in your home and get $10 off your next order. If your photo includes you or a friend in the shot you’ll be entered to win a monthly drawing for a $200 gift certificate!

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Tuesday, March 20th, 2012

Emeco Chairs and Stools Are as Fresh and Modern as Ever

Becky

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I love seeing my favorite pieces used in fresh designs, both commercial and residential. We recently received some gorgeous shots of the iconic Emeco chairs in action that I thought I’d share.

This is Urban Farmer bar by environmental designer, David Ashen of D-ASH Design. The space combines the 1951 Barstools from Emeco with reclaimed materials such as a 20-foot communal table. You can visit it on the 8th floor lobby of the Nines Hotel in Portland. The restaurant honors local culinary traditions, sourcing ingredients from organic farms nearby. But can you can go visit the cult that raised the chicken you want to order like Fred and Carrie did on Portlandia? I’m not sure.

Here’s a closer look at the 1951 stool. It’s looking better than ever in 2012.

This may be one of the most aesthetically pleasing workplace cafeterias I’ve ever seen. Well, it’s more of an intimate kitchen, and it’s at the headquarters of Clif Bars. It’s called Kali’s Kitchen and their website is pretty great; check it out. The employees over there are eating a lot of other things besides energy bars! Designed by ZGF Architecture, the kitchen design prioritized sustainability and re-using materials. Appropriately, the seating includes the 1006 Navy Chair and Navy Stools, which are made with 80% recycled aluminum.

Here’s a close up of the Navy Stool.

If you have an Emeco fetish like I do, you’ll love checking out their Tumblr stream. I also rounded some Navy Chairs up a long time ago for my other gig at Houzz. Designers tend to pick the chairs for the freshest rooms around, whether at a home’s kitchen island or in the chicest of bars and restaurants.

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Friday, June 3rd, 2011

Flicker Faves on Fridays:

Becky

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This week, a home in Salt Lake City submitted by Patrick Davis Designs caught my eye on flickr. I love the way the simple palette makes the wood walls and beams really stand out, as well as the beautiful mid-century furnishings. Thanks for adding it to our Fresh New Spaces Group!

All photos property of Patrick Davis Designs. To see the rest of this house, click here. Also, check out patrickdavisdesign.com.

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Thursday, April 21st, 2011

Flickr Faves on Fridays: Anti-Depressive Vintage

Becky

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I love checking out the home of blogger Kay Loves Vintage,and I was so excited to see that she posted this picture to our OTHER Flickr group that I started, Anti-Depressive Living. To be honest, I had been ignoring that group for awhile because a bunch of people had posted all kinds of stuff they were selling and I didn’t feel like dealing with it (I’m a really bad Flickr administrator). Anyway, it’s totally taken on a life of its own and the variety of images posted in there are totally wackadoodle and I love it. It makes absolutely NO sense whatsoever.

Well, that was NOT to say that Kay’s wackadoodle, she has got it going on, and I’ve learned a lot about vintage pieces from her. I think I spy a PH light, some vintage Eames shell chairs, a Catherine Holm bowl, perhaps some Dansk (?) and that’s the extent of my vintage knowledge.

Also, Kay has a cool blog called KayLovesVintage and it’s a delight.

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Wednesday, January 19th, 2011

Designer Interview: Adam Fitzgerald of Jackson Street Furniture

Becky

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Recently I have the pleasure of sitting down with (O.K., actually  emailing back and forth with; this is the era of the Golden Globe winning The Social Network) Adam Fitzgerald, architect and furniture designer extraordinaire. I hope you will find as much inspiration from his work and his advice as I have!

Please tell us a bit about how your company came to be – your creative background and how you began to build your
business.

I’ve been an architect for over 20 years, but I’ve designed and built furniture since I was in graduate school. Working
with furniture is satisfying for me because it’s such an intimate thing. We interact with furniture on a daily basis, and
almost constantly at that. Plus it’s easier to take chances with furniture. When you’re doing a building that costs
millions of dollars it can be tough to get the client to try something different. So furniture offers me the opportunity to
experiment, and try things that are “on the edge”. I was also motivated to design and build furniture when I first got
out of school because I couldn’t find good contemporary furniture that was affordable, so it’s always been a goal of
mine to sell a line that is creative, but also affordable to most people.

Please take us on a bit of a virtual tour of your studio. What’s the neighborhood like? What were some of your
priorities when finding a space where you need to be creative?

My current studio is fairly ordinary. It’s a “flex” space with an office and a large open area for the shop. The
neighborhood is a gritty area on the north side of Denver. I really like this kind of neighborhood. There’s a real
mix of businesses and artists in the area. I can find sources for all kinds of materials and ideas just by talking with
people in my building. There’s everything here from another contemporary furniture company to companies that mill
complex machine parts. So the “community” I could say, is very important in choosing a space. Before this location
I had a space here in Denver in a building with ten artists that offered a great a chance for feedback and inspiration.
Unfortunately the owner sold the building, and we were booted to the street!

When I step outside I get a great view of the Denver skyline with the mountains in the background which isn’t too
bad! I can even see the last building I did in the skyline—a 41 story condominium that I finished off last year, right
before I started Jackson Street Furniture.

Where do you start when designing something new? A sketch? A wood sample? A dream?
I get inspiration everywhere. I often get ideas from ordinary things I see that have nothing to do with furniture but
that have a geometry, or character that strikes me as beautiful. I’ve consciously tried to stay away from studying the
history of furniture, or specific styles. I try approach furniture design from the “outside”. In school, I had to study a lot
of architectural history and I think when designing you can actually use “style” as a crutch that keeps you from really
trying more innovative things. I sketch all my ideas. Many of them go nowhere, but I keep them all. I revisit them
every so often. I’ve found that often a sketch from years ago will inspire a new idea when I look at it with fresh eyes.

How do you stay inspired? Any advice for those who are suffering from a creative block?
I always keep a sketchbook close by. When inspiration hits, I sketch it out. Sometimes it will be months or even
years before I come back to it, but I also might go into the studio the next day and start building it. The building
process keeps me inspired. I often start with an idea I’ve sketched but by the time I’m done it’s morphed into
something entirely different. That keeps the creative juices flowing—I love being spontaneous with design.

If I’m “blocked’ creatively, I try to get away from what I’m working on and rejuvenate my mind by doing something
else. I think the subconscious takes over if you’re distracted and before long, new ideas work their way to the
surface.

Onto the furniture! There is something a dash Rat Pack about some of your pieces to me (I mean that as a
compliment – am I way off?), in particular the Zoom Table and BOG (O)Val Table. I also feel a sense of nostalgia
when I look at the Open Wide Table. You clearly balance a touch of retro inspiration with your contemporary designs.
How do you balance the old and the new?

I definitely think you’re right about some of my furniture having a mid century quality, and I’ve had others tell me that
as well. (I like the idea of Dean Martin pulling up next to the Zoom table with a scotch and a cigarette!) But it’s not
really something I consciously strive for. I’ve always been drawn to simple geometry and forms that are streamlined,
but also a bit quirky and unusual—not the more rigid, formal shapes of “classical” modernism. I love the designs you
find on fabrics from the 50’s and 60’s.

Do you have any words of wisdom for creatives who are ready to make the leap into a building a business?
First, if it’s something you love to do—definitely go for it. Life’s short, and you’ve got to take chances. Second, I think
it’s important to dive into the deep end, so to speak. Go “all in”, and immerse yourself in it. To me, that’s the only
way to do your best work, and give yourself and your ideas the best shot at being successful.

Adam, thanks so much for sitting down with us today and sharing your inspirations and advice! To see the Jackson Street Furniture line, click here.

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