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Wednesday, September 2nd, 2015

Design Public Guide: Great Desk Chairs for Homework Time

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Well, we’ve covered desks and lamps in our Back to School Design Public Guides. Now it’s time for comfy and attractive chairs for homework time. Here are some of our top picks from around the site. 13-0005343.jpg

Steelcase Think Chair. This ultimate desk chair is smart enough to adjust to you and the rest of your family members’ weights and postures. There’s built-in lumbar allows for additional dialed in back support. The 4-way adjustable arms provide support for your arms, wrists, and shoulders in a variety of postures. The 4-way adjustable arms provide support for your arms, wrists, and shoulders in a variety of postures.



Steelcase Move Multi-Use Chair with Upholstered Seat. There’s more to this stylish and stackable chair that meets the eye. Under the seat cushion there is a support system that conforms to your body — flexors inside the seat curve with your curves and move as you move. What I like most about it is it’s versatility; it can serve as a comfy desk chair or dining chair. So working at the kitchen table is comfortable, or if it’s in your kiddo’s room, you can reclaim it when she goes off to college.

rollersideappleModernica Side Shell with Rolling Base Chair. This molded fiberglass classic is a modern icon, made from the original molds that the Eameses designed. The seat height adjusts approximately from 18 inches to 22 inches. I chose the version that rolls, because rolling is fun and can tempt your child right into the homework seat. Let him have some fun cruising the floor before he has to get down to business. blue_graphite


Steelcase Turnstone Buoy Chair. Sometimes ya gotta shake up homework time a bit. The buoy chair looks like it’s meant for something more fun than homework, so let it work its deceptive magic and tempt your child right over to those sentences she needs to diagram. The buoy wobbles and engages the core, and the height can be adjusted in a five-inch range.


Blu Dot Real Good Chair. We picked this powder-coated beauty in red because it enlivens the senses and ignites passion. While available in other lovely colors, grab a red one for homework time.

visu_sledbase_black_field_142.jpgMuuto Visu Chair — Sled Base, Upholstered Seat. The cozy upholstered seat on this version of the Visu chair is inviting and ergonomic. The sled base on this version adds an irresistibly modern touch.



Blu Dot Roy Chair. This chair made the list for four great reasons. It’s padded, attractive, stackable and available at a great price point.

We wish we had the room to share more details about our desk chair selection. But you can check them out for yourself:

See more desk chairs


Wednesday, April 10th, 2013

Eero Saarinen’s Greatest Hits


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I am so excited for Museum of Design Atlanta’s upcoming Eero Saarinen exhibit – it starts this Sunday April 14th and will run through June 30, 2013. For those of you who won’t be in Atlanta during that time, I thought we could do a post on Saarinen here to let you enjoy his work too. Here’s a quick peek at a fe of his greatest hits:

The Miller House, Columbus, Indiana 1957: Now owned and maintained by The Indianapolis Museum of Art, the Miller House is open for tours. If you visit, be sure to pay attention the landscape by Daniel Urban Kiley; it’s one of the most spectacular modern gardens in the U.S. and the interior fun provided by Alexander Girard. Tickets sell out fast, so be sure to plan ahead if you’re planning a trip to the modern-architecture rich Columbus! You can buy them here.

photos via The Indianapolis Museum of Art

The TWA Terminal at JFK 1962: The last time I was in this building, it was leaky and there was a bird flying around, but this architecture was all about the Jet Age, back when flying was glamorous and exciting:

photo by Ezra Stoller

John Deere Headquarters, Moline, Illinois 1964: After catching the eye of John Deere’s president, William Hewitt with his designs, Saarinen designed the striking headquarters for the company. The project is a wonderful example of modern architecture living in harmony with its surroundings:

photo via

The Gateway Arch in St. Louis 1965: One of the most iconic structures (at 630 feet high, it’s also the tallest monument) in the U.S. is also by Saarinen. Again, he teamed up with Dan Kiley to complete the landscape. Isn’t this picture crazy? It gives me vertico just thinking about it, and it also makes me miss my erector set!

Saarinen’s furniture designs continue to be some of the most popular examples of mid-century modern style today.

He designed the Womb Chair (1964) at the behest of his good pal Florence Knoll, who wanted a chair she could curl up in. If one wants to stretch out in it, the matching ottoman is a great addition.

Of course, his tulip table, a.k.a. Knoll Saarinen Table (1956), is one of the most iconic pieces of furniture from the mid-century modern period. Saarinen was not fond of legs and wanted a cleaner look when it came to kitchen and dining areas. “The undercarriage of chairs and tables in a typical interior makes an ugly, confusing, unrestful world,” he said. “I wanted to clear up the slum of legs. I wanted to make the chair all one thing again.”

For a typical kitchen table with four legs plus four chairs, Saarinen decreased “the slum of legs” from 20 legs to 5 pedestals. Not too shabby!

For those of you in Atlanta during the next few months, be sure to check out MODA’s Eero Saarinen exhibit!


Tuesday, July 17th, 2012

Hans Wegner and His Wishbone Chairs


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When I noticed our sister store, Danish Design store, was having a sale (buy five and get a sixth for free) on Hans Wegner’s Wishbone Chairs, my mind started to spin, as I have been coveting them for years. I don’t know if I’d ever be able to pick a style or color as they are so much fun in the bright colors yet so mid-century modern cool in the original finishes, but I dream of having these in my dining room.

Hans J. Wegner was born in 1914 in Denmark. As he matured, it turned out he was the right person in the right place at the right time. He cut his teeth in design and furniture making as a teenager, apprenticing for a master cabinetmaker. He then went on to study furniture making as well as architecture in Copenhagen, where he was inspired by the Carpenters’ Guild Furniture Exhibits.

Wegner continued his education by working under Arne Jacobsen. who is probably best known for designing the Swan Chair and the Egg Chair, which both remain modern icons (personally, my favorite is a vintage Grand Prix chair, but that’s a story for another day):

After developing his style of organic and functional designs, Wegner designed the Wishbone Chair in 1949, during the height of mid-century modern design. The chair has had a major influence on design ever since and is a Danish Modern icon. It works in so many rooms, from a Japanese tea house vibe to very contemporary spaces.

Feast your eyes on the Wishbone in a variety of colors and room styles:

image from Kristen Rivoli Interior Design

Tempted yet? If you are, add 6 to your shopping cart over at Danish Design Store and enter 6FOR5 at checkout.

Most images via The Wishbone Chair Blog; a few at the bottom I ripped from Pinterest and have no idea where they originally came from, which I hate to do, but I had to share them. Please let me know if you know the sources.