Visit our other brands: danishdesignstore.com, adogslife.net

Wednesday, September 11th, 2013

Yummy Kitchens

Becky

Posted by Becky | View all posts by Becky
1 Comment »

We love pinning our favorite kitchens to our Pinterest board, Yummy Kitchens, and the latest pin was Cameron Diaz’s  New York City apartment (interior design by Kelly Wearstler). As her chic pad goes viral after being featured in Elle Decor’s latest issue, I thought, why not jump on the bandwagon? The entire apartment has a luxe-meets-bravura modern vibe, full of rich fabrics and amazing metallic finishes, like this stunning reflective backsplash.

photo by William Abranowicz for Elle Decor

White kitchens still seem to rule and they are everywhere you look, so seeing the emerald green cabinets and unlacquered brass counters and backsplash were refreshing to see.

Jeroen van der Spek for VTWonen via The Kitchn

It’s fun to see people experimenting with metals besides stainless steel. This clever use of copper pipes adds great shine, patina and a dash of steampunk style to this kitchen.

photo by Manhattan Nest

I’m also digging the contrast of black and white and black and gray in today’s kitchens, and really love “the inky blue black” of these cabinets. This renovation on Manhattan Nest left me gobsmacked. Even more shocking, it was completed on a budget of $1230.74. That is just ridiculously inspiring, isn’t it?

All of the new tile patterns out there these days offer endless possibilities for unique backsplashes. A lack of upper cabinets and shelves allows these horizontal stripes to stun and the kitchen to appear very open and airy.

photo by Michael Graydon

It may seem tough to sacrifice upper cabinets for clear wall space or open shelving and it’s a personal choice. However, if you really pare down your china, glassware and cookware to the bare essentials, you may just find you have room (do you ever really use that “World’s Best Boss” coffee mug, or that extra set of china?). One idea I love is this plate rack. It creates an organized, beautiful and functional way to stash china within reach while keeping things open. One tip to those considering such a move or open shelving – you’re going to have to dust more, so keep that in mind.

What kind of kitchens are you finding yummy today? Please let us know in the comments section, and/or add “#yummykitchens” to your kitchen pins so that we can all find them with ease!

Share

Thursday, August 12th, 2010

In Honor of The 25th Anniversery of St. Elmo’s Fire…

Becky

Posted by Becky | View all posts by Becky
5 Comments »

…May I present Demi Moore’s hilarious, glamorous at the time Georgetown apartment:

JULES: So, what do you think?

KEVIN: Very, uh, subtle…and very pink.

It was decorated by her neighbor Ron:

What’s funny is that it has some touches that remind me of Kelly Wearstler’s current Bravura Modern phase. Very Eighties Miami Vice (what is that thing hanging from the cabinet?!?!):

The piece de resistance is the huge Billy Idol face on the wall, complete with neon light earring. Unfortunately, I could not get a clear shot of this, but you get the idea:

What was most baffling was this clown that remained after Jules’ creditors came an cleaned her out. Apparently the repo men were scared of clowns:

Going back to the beginning of the movie, I can see this thing SAT ON HER BED! Really? Look closely at this bad picture from my tv:

It’s funny, this was really the only set that seemed ridiculously dated. The rest of them are as ageless as Rob Lowe’s face. I’ll share them with you in another post, as this one is getting to be way too long!

Share

Tuesday, November 24th, 2009

Kelly Wearstler’s Hue

Becky

Posted by Becky | View all posts by Becky
Leave a comment!

51FGkORVhbL._SS400_

It’s here, it’s here! I love it when UPS, a.k.a. The Amazon Fairy*, brings me pre-ordered treats. Today it was Hue by Kelly Wearstler. This book is stunning. I think half of the designs are the exact opposite of ANYTHING I would ever have in my house, but here’s what. Remember when Domino featured Wearstler’s Bravura Modern poolhouse and everyone was all “what in the hell is this?!?!?!?” I was like that too – I wrote about it in an incoherent fashion here. However, take a look around.

Look at the boxes bedecked with clunky stones. Then look at the clunky rocky Rachel Zoe-y jewelry that is in fashion today. Look at the crazy blobby furniture and then check out what Calvin Klein Home, Fendi Casa and Armani Casa are offering right now. Look at the Keith Haring-esque custom wallpapers Basquiat paintings and think of how graffiti and the culture of the streets has infiltrated so many aspects of the avant garde and mainstream culture. Hear the theme from “Miami Vice” start to go through your head as you look at Kelly’s main residence, and then look at the eightiss leggings and shoulder pads that are ruling the runways right now (personally, this girl sported both of those in the eighties and will not be repeating herself. For the record, I never went near neon or parachute pants). I digress: Wearstler sets the trends.

As for the book, the photography is beautiful. The names of the hues themselves (i.e. “camellia,” “wisteria,” “vermillion”) and the coordinating colored pencils, sketches, and idea-scapes** that go with them are inspiring. Think about all those chic steakhouses with white-painted exposed brick walls, statement light fixtures (perhaps a series of oversized drum shades in black), and spare decoration, then check out how Wearstler’s bars, restaurants and lobbies celebrate being ornate and stimulate your eyeballs and your conversations. It’s fun to look around a space in awe and feel your jaw drop whether you like the decor or not.

51JJqQjhMAL._SS400_-1

51vSHu8olpL._SS400_

So, to sum up ever so briefly:

LIKE: Fashion as inspiration (I’m such a Kelly geek I recognized half her featured clothes from Top Design and magazine spreads).

DISLIKE: Cheesy styling of shoes in the photos – in between chairs, next to the bed – when will people stop doing the thing where they throw the Manolos or the Loubies into a room shot like it’s icing on the cake?

LIKE: The fact that she goes all out, no compromises, when designing her own homes

DISLIKE: The thought of having to live in one of her houses. I could not sleep with a crazy huge head vase full of flowers looking at me. It can’t be very feng shui.

LIKE: The way the crazy sculptures remind me of Duran Duran album covers

DISLIKE: The crazy sculptures

LIKE: The gorgeous photography, the lack of useless drivel that no one is going to read, the self-awareness that this tome’s purpose is enrapturing eye candy.

DISLIKE: That half of the photos were revealed in magazines already.

LIKE: The wallpapered ceilings, the gorgeous linens for Sferra

DISLIKE: Oh, who cares, enough negativity. I am totally in love with this book. Perhaps it’s because that first Domino poolhouse feature gave me ample time to get used to it.

51kNuLtysqL._SS400_

To check out some potential Wearstler precedents, read this post.

*My Fine Garden, I totally swiped that from the tweet you sent me!

**I hate to add “-scapes” to words, especially “bedscape,” but I have no vocabulary today. These were basically assemblages.

Share

Monday, October 19th, 2009

Inspiration Monday: Seventies and Eighties

Becky

Posted by Becky | View all posts by Becky
3 Comments »

Lately I’ve been trying to make sense of Kelly Wearstler’s latest Bravura Modern designs. They seem to be in every magazine this month, as part of the promotion for her new book Hue. While they are way too much for me, when I deconstruct them, I can appreciate the pieces and what she’s getting at. Seeing how beautiful her line for SFERRA has helped me see this, as well as how much I love some of the wallpapers she’s designed. She gets a lot of her current inspiration from the 1980s. The eighties usually make me think of shoulder pads, Miami Vice, too many florals, chintz, and peach.

This week, I decided to take down an old book from my shelf, The Decorator by Florence de Dampierre. It’s fabulous. You’d never guess it was published in 1989, because the designs featured in it are so timeless and elegant. You can see how much the works of Sister Parish, Albert Hadley, David Hicks, Bunny Williams et. al. have influenced more classic designers like Michael S. Smith and Celerie Kemble today, as well as renegades like Wearstler. Here are just a few favorites from this must-have tome.

Mario Buatta mid-1970s bedroom. photographed by Richard Champion.

Garousle/Bonetti Design. photographs by Simon Kentish; sketch by Mattia Bonetti

2 preceding photos: Albert Hadley Design. Photographs by Antoine Bootz

Michael Krieger Design. Photograph by Antoine Bootz

Sandra Nunnerly Design for a Kip’s Bay Show House. Photograph by Grand Mudford

Does this one scream Jonathan Adler/Kelly Wearstler or what?

Betty Sherrill Design. Photograph by Grisby and Michael Dunn

Right now The Decorator is available used at amazon for under $5.00. Buy it! You won’t regret it! As for Hue, I haven’t previewed it yet, so I can’t recommend it, but I am heading over to pre-order it now and I’ll let you know.

first image via mirror mirror via Vogue.

Share

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2007

Hollywood Regency 101

Becky

Posted by Becky | View all posts by Becky
35 Comments »

via ApartmentTherapy

Let me just say this is the never ending post. I tried to keep it simple but it got away from me. If I don’t simply press “publish,” I’ll never finish it, so I’m just going to do it. Anyway, Hollywood Regency, I don’t quite know how to define it, but I know it when I see it…

About 12 years ago I had the privilege of staying at a Hollywood Director/Vogue photographer’s Alexander house in Palm Springs (my friend’s little brother was his personal assistant at the time). I was still deep into a Shabby Chic phase of decorating, and hadn’t yet attended architecture school. I wasn’t ready for his modern Hollywood Regency style, I didn’t know what a Saarinen tulip table was, I didn’t understand all the shiny surfaces and basket chairs hanging from the trees, but I knew I liked it. This was my intro to Hollywood Regency glam. Now I FANTISIZE about that glamorous modern space.

via Nate Berkus

“Glam it Up” is a buzz phrase I keep hearing over and over. It’s starting to get on my nerves, the same way “zen,” “bring the outdoors in” and “make it pop” sound like such cliches. I guess it’s because people often use the buzz phrases incorrectly to justify some really lame design moves, like that “Glamalicious” nightmare contestant on “Design Star,” or maybe it’s just because I’m grouchy.

It seems that every few years the trend switches from grunge to glam – whether it’s from strict Victorian rules to the freedom of flappers in the roaring ’20’s to the grungy Great Depression, from patcholi hippie style to ’80’s Reagan red and Trump’s King Midas amounts of gold, from the Seattle flannel invasion and heroin chic to Courtney Love getting a Hollywood stylist for her Oscar nomination (not that Galliano gown with real trash stuck to it, but rather the glamourous perfect People Vs. Larry Flynt Courtney!), we’re always seesawing from grunge to glam to grunge. My theory is that the influx of glamour right now it’s a bit of backlash against minimalism by those of us who love to insert our sense of humors into our style at home. Cluttering up the barest minimal – it’s like attacking a severly simple Calvin Klein outfit with a Bedazzler filled with Swarovski crystals. Read the rest of this entry »

Share