You have no items to compare.

Default welcome msg!

cart (0)

Thursday, July 2nd, 2015

Our Top Five Favorite Mad Men Design Moments


Posted by Becky | View all posts by Becky
Leave a comment!

Now that Don Draper finally nailed the ultimate account and Mad Men has disappeared into 1970 forever, I’ve been binge watching the whole thing all over again on Netflix. There were so many fantastic moments of graphic design, fashion design, even hair design (and some not-so-good ones, those ’70s staches and sideburns were not doing the characters any favors). But most of all, I loved to watch Mad Men for the spot-on 1960s set design.

There are too many to count; with all that Eames, Saarinen and other mid-century icons lurking everywhere. Here are some of the highlights:

FullSizeRender copy 3

What does this guy need an office for? No actual business ever happened here, except for a fake phone call to Lee Gardner over at Lucky Strike weeks after Roger had lost the account.

FullSizeRender copy 4

1) The best moment to me was when Jane Sterling hired a decorator to redecorate Roger’s office, the spot where he dictated that not-so-bestselling Sterling’s Gold. A tulip table, a CJ Corona chair, op art and more iconic items in a black and white palette. I mean, check out that phone!


“A modern Chinoiserie breakfront, a Dunbar Japanese-influenced sofa, silk Dupioni drapes, Murano vases, and a classic Drexel end table.” — Betty Draper’s decorator


2) Betty redecorates the living room. Betty hires a decorator that gives her sharp Hollywood Regency style for her living room. Don walks in and moves a lamp around to make it perfect. Then Betty buys a very symbolic fainting couch that messes the whole look up. It’s so appropriate because the poor woman is trapped in an era that squeezes her like a Victorian corset.


3) Betty goes to get analyzed. Has there ever been a sadder woman on a Barcelona daybed? And did analysts really call husbands to give them the rundown after the wife’s appointment? That was crazy. Anyway, this image is fun to compare and contrast with the fainting couch one above it.


4) Don flies to sunny L.A. and winds up hanging out with a bunch of European tax evaders in “The Jet Set” episode. According to Curbed, this house is The Fox House, an abode Sinatra rented for 10 years. If that’s not a ringing endorsement that it’s classic California modern, I don’t know what is. The set designers and art director captured that clean white, glass and that unique California cool.


Bert Cooper’s Japanese-inspired office. No shoes allowed in here. The arrival of new art was always exciting and gave us insight into Bert’s character and tastes. A new Rothko had everyone in the office a tizzy, a Pollack was behind his head during the moon landing, but the best was the sex octopus:

Screen Shot 2015-07-02 at 1.30.43 PM

But the best sex octopus moment was this vision of Peggy Olson, completely transformed, strolling into McCann-Erickson unrecognizable from the young secretary we’d met a decade earlier.


What was your favorite Mad Men design moment? Please share it with us!


Thursday, February 3rd, 2011

Another Fabulous Online Design Magazine: High Gloss


Posted by Becky | View all posts by Becky

Welcome High Gloss Magazine! I actually heard about this magazine the other night while watching Chelsea Lately from Ms. Handler herself (the contents of her purse are featured in one spread). Wow, while the print magazines are disappearing, it’s opening up a lot of opportunities for enterprising creatives to create online magazines. High Gloss, you had me with the ivory donut phone and the twin Dorothy Draper dressers on the cover…


Wednesday, December 1st, 2010

Joel McHale’s Hollywood Hills Home


Posted by Becky | View all posts by Becky

I was already really jealous of Joel McHale’s wife, as she is married to one tall hilarious drink of water, but then in this month’s In Style I saw what a talented interior designer she is and I became even more jealous. She and her co-collaborator, Elizabeth Gordon both used to work for Kelly Wearstler. The result is a lovely home that’s got bits of regency and bravura modern all over the place. Here’s a peak at the McHales’ Hollywood Hills casa:

I spy DwellStudio bedding in their son Eddie’s room:

Photographs by Douglas Friedman for In Style


Tuesday, November 24th, 2009

Kelly Wearstler’s Hue


Posted by Becky | View all posts by Becky
Leave a comment!


It’s here, it’s here! I love it when UPS, a.k.a. The Amazon Fairy*, brings me pre-ordered treats. Today it was Hue by Kelly Wearstler. This book is stunning. I think half of the designs are the exact opposite of ANYTHING I would ever have in my house, but here’s what. Remember when Domino featured Wearstler’s Bravura Modern poolhouse and everyone was all “what in the hell is this?!?!?!?” I was like that too – I wrote about it in an incoherent fashion here. However, take a look around.

Look at the boxes bedecked with clunky stones. Then look at the clunky rocky Rachel Zoe-y jewelry that is in fashion today. Look at the crazy blobby furniture and then check out what Calvin Klein Home, Fendi Casa and Armani Casa are offering right now. Look at the Keith Haring-esque custom wallpapers Basquiat paintings and think of how graffiti and the culture of the streets has infiltrated so many aspects of the avant garde and mainstream culture. Hear the theme from “Miami Vice” start to go through your head as you look at Kelly’s main residence, and then look at the eightiss leggings and shoulder pads that are ruling the runways right now (personally, this girl sported both of those in the eighties and will not be repeating herself. For the record, I never went near neon or parachute pants). I digress: Wearstler sets the trends.

As for the book, the photography is beautiful. The names of the hues themselves (i.e. “camellia,” “wisteria,” “vermillion”) and the coordinating colored pencils, sketches, and idea-scapes** that go with them are inspiring. Think about all those chic steakhouses with white-painted exposed brick walls, statement light fixtures (perhaps a series of oversized drum shades in black), and spare decoration, then check out how Wearstler’s bars, restaurants and lobbies celebrate being ornate and stimulate your eyeballs and your conversations. It’s fun to look around a space in awe and feel your jaw drop whether you like the decor or not.



So, to sum up ever so briefly:

LIKE: Fashion as inspiration (I’m such a Kelly geek I recognized half her featured clothes from Top Design and magazine spreads).

DISLIKE: Cheesy styling of shoes in the photos – in between chairs, next to the bed – when will people stop doing the thing where they throw the Manolos or the Loubies into a room shot like it’s icing on the cake?

LIKE: The fact that she goes all out, no compromises, when designing her own homes

DISLIKE: The thought of having to live in one of her houses. I could not sleep with a crazy huge head vase full of flowers looking at me. It can’t be very feng shui.

LIKE: The way the crazy sculptures remind me of Duran Duran album covers

DISLIKE: The crazy sculptures

LIKE: The gorgeous photography, the lack of useless drivel that no one is going to read, the self-awareness that this tome’s purpose is enrapturing eye candy.

DISLIKE: That half of the photos were revealed in magazines already.

LIKE: The wallpapered ceilings, the gorgeous linens for Sferra

DISLIKE: Oh, who cares, enough negativity. I am totally in love with this book. Perhaps it’s because that first Domino poolhouse feature gave me ample time to get used to it.


To check out some potential Wearstler precedents, read this post.

*My Fine Garden, I totally swiped that from the tweet you sent me!

**I hate to add “-scapes” to words, especially “bedscape,” but I have no vocabulary today. These were basically assemblages.


Wednesday, November 4th, 2009

Prized Possessions: What’s Yours?


Posted by Becky | View all posts by Becky

Decorators should never insist on throwing out everything the client has. Even when they are far from perfect, loved possessions add personality.

-Billy Baldwin

What are your loved possessions? Please share them with us! I’ll start: Two of mine are these Staffordshire dogs that were my grandmother’s. They always sat on her mantle on Cape Cod and they always remind me of her. She was the ultimate animal lover – every bird and stray cat in her neighborhood was fed by her, and her dog Guinness had gourmet meals prepared for him every night.

Now they have separated, one of them has a place of pride on my Parson’s desk:


© 2015 Store. All Rights Reserved.