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Friday, September 27th, 2013

Getting Toasty: Where to Put the Firewood

Becky

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This was the first week we had a chill in the air here in Atlanta and I could not be happier that the humidity is gone and sweater weather is on its way! Have you called the woodman yet? Whether you have that cord of wood sitting in an unsightly stack in the middle of the yard, you’re ready to do some splitting over the weekend or you want to plan for how to do it with panache, we have some ideas for you about how to keep it looking nice and ready to burn.

This woodpile is huge! While we don’t recommend stacking wood up against a wood deck or siding, on brick against a stone house you’re safe from termites. Give it a little zshush with some windowboxes on top. This time of year, they look great with pumpkins, for the later months, plant them with evergreens or simply switch out boughs of pine, fir or spruce.

via http://chaseneal.vsco.co/

I actually like the rustic Paul Bunyon look of a haphazard stack of logs that’s waiting to be split. However, if you’ve ever seen the movie “The Strangers,” you’ll never want to leave an ax outside.

This charming cart is so practical; you can wheel it to wherever you have the logs stashed outside rather than struggling with big bundles.

photo: jfhillipsdesign.com

Do you have a non-working fireplace? Don’t be bummed, you can dress it up with logs. Just make sure they are completely dry before creating a stack like this.

While stacking logs against drywall or masonry may bring in some creepy crawlers, you can take some precautions. Use a metal rack and again, make sure that your wood is dry. Do not place it directly against the wall, scoot it out a few inches. This adds so much texture and rustic visual interest to the room that it seems worth the risk. Plus, it keeps you from having to open up the door and let all the cold in.

In fact, I’m loving this modern take, which combines industrial metal cylinders with the natural wood.

This smart niche is lined in metal to prevent damage to walls, and its scale and shape add a nice contrast to the ornate fireplace surround.

This wall-mounted unit transforms the logs into sculpture and keeps them from touching the drywall.

via Chandos Interiors

This chic log holder doubles as a console table.

How will you be stashing your firewood this winter?

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Tuesday, September 24th, 2013

High-Flying Design

Becky

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Why are most planes so boring looking? It seems like airliners spend millions in paint jobs and additional drag that uses up more fuel every time two mega-airlines merge. However, some companies are doing some eye-catching things to planes that are anything but plain.

Photo: Eva Air

This week the Hello Kitty plane from Eva Air made a lot of U.S. headlines when it landed at LAX.

Photo: Finnair

My modern-day personal favorite is the collaboration between Finnair and Marimekko, who have applied some of their most popular prints with planes. There’s a great video about the cooperation between the company most known for iconic Finnish fabric patterns and the airline here:

Photo: Braniff International Airways

This is not a new idea; Braniff International Airways really upped the artistic plane game back in the Don Draper advertising era, though I don’t think Cooper Sterling Draper Price ever came up with anything this exciting as these Braniff Alexander Calder bedecked planes for Mohawk. The full story is great, and you can check it out braniffpages.com.

Photo: Braniff International Airways

The photo above shows the only time I’d would not get tired of the mother-?#$@#$! planes on a mother-#!*@#?!!$# plane!

My fictional personal favorite is Austin Powers’ shagadelic plane. I could have sworn there was an Emilio Pucci design on a plane back in the day, but there were just the fabulous flight attendant uniforms with the crazy bubble head thing. The Austin Powers plane is the closest thing to a Pucci print that was out there, and it just suited the character and the era so well. Plus, the interiors were so fitting with the exterior.

Does a certain airline’s aesthetic choices suit you? Let us know in the Comments!

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Friday, September 20th, 2013

Doing Weekend Shopping? We’ve Got Great Sales Going on

Becky

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I wanted to let you know about two great sales we have going on right now.  First of all, if you’ve been saving up for an iconic modern classic from Knoll, now’s the time to bust open that piggy bank. Knoll is on sale from September 20-October 1st, 2013.

Personally, I’ve got my eye on George Nakashima Straight Chairs:

and a Noguchi Cyclone Table:

I love the way it looks with Eero Saarinen’s Executive Chairs; they aren’t just for Mad Men-ish offices anymore. In fact, I have one in my own bedroom.

Check out all the Knoll we have on sale

Speaking of offices we also have another iconic mid-century modern brand on sale. Selected items from Steelcase’s Turnstone collection are also up to 15% off right now. Steelcase is great for the office, the playroom, the living room, the family room and the bedroom.

This is the Steelcase Turnstone Jenny Coffee Table. Its shape is modern, yet it also has a contemporary sensibility. It’s a box that floats, and the wood grain adds warmth to any room, whether you’re a minimalist or a new traditionalist. The reason I love it so much is that you can keep that top cleared off; the bottom has plenty of room for your remotes, coffee table books, magazines, laptop, pet toys and whatever else tends to accumulate around the house.

This is the Steelcase Turnstone Big Lamp. I love the proportions; the shade is a narrow band that gets its heft from the black color, while the white stand is sturdy yet delicate. It has a clean look that will inspire you to keep those nightstands or your desk neat and organized.

See all Steelcase Turnstone items on sale

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Monday, September 16th, 2013

Touring the Old Fourth Ward

Becky

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Loft, bungalows, modern houses, the Beltline, new parks, Martin Luther King’s birthplace, fabulous restaurants, funky shops … they all come together in Atlanta’s Old Fourth Ward, a historic area that’s becoming one of the city’s favorites. This Sunday a handful of residents opened their doors and let us into their homes for a Fall in the 4th Ward home tour and it was fantastic.

Our tour began at a former cotton warehouse in Studioplex. In the courtyard, you can see the old metal doors and structure of the second story, which has been opened up (it’s also open to the sky, so balconies that look out here are great bonus areas). Here we saw three very different ways people are living in these true lofts. One was a one-room full of amazing artwork and custom furniture, another had added a second story loft bedroom and rents the space out for events, the third was a wide-open artist’s live-work studio with 15 foot ceilings. Here’s a look at that one.

One of my favorite things about this space was that the owner had separated her bedroom with a clear glass wall and installed this stained glass window. On the other side is the media area complete with built-in shelves around the window.

The owner is also an architect, which explained how she designed this beautiful kitchen:

The cabinets were rough wood with stainless steel cabinets; the kitchen island has a beautiful patina. The open shelves were artfully arranged, and the pantry, complete with antique pie safe, was stunning:

A few blocks away we toured through this beautiful modern home by TaC Studios:

This home is Earthcraft certified and sustainable elements include a 500 gallon rain cistern. It’s located near the new Beltline East Side Trail and it’s scale respects the other homes in the neighborhood. While compact, the interiors are open and airy, and make it feel like a much larger house inside. Connections to the yard through doors to the dipping pool courtyard and the master bedroom balcony open the living space to the outdoors.

Finally, we came upon a once-derelict bungalow that had been rehabbed and sold by an architect neighbor. You know, when you see that a lot of architects are flocking to a particular neighborhood, it’s an early sign of transition. It’s amazing to see this neighborhood now compared to what it was like when I first toured the area about six years ago.

The lovely blue door was an indicator of what to expect inside. The architect made the most of the small 2-bedroom, 1-bath home, and the owner has an amazing eye for mixing eclectic pieces.

The living room opens into the kitchen, which also incorporates the dining table. Sorry my shots do not do the beautiful home justice.

Did you attend the tour? If so, which house was your favorite?

For more, check us out on Instagram!

Photos of the modern house courtesy of TaC Studios Architecture. All other photos by Becky Harris.

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Thursday, September 12th, 2013

Around the Web – Owls in Residence, Classical-Meets-Hipster

Becky

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Sometimes I forget to share all of the great things I’ve seen around the web that is world-wide. Here are some of the best things that are floating around in cyberspace right now.

image by Kai Fagerström

Loving this project where photographer Kai Fagerström documented all the critters inhabiting this house in the woods.

photo by Katherine Marks for the New York Times

Scoop up a slop sink in NYC for just under $10K? The New York Times reported that buildings are now selling off prime real estate like pieces of the hallway, landings and closets that hold the slop sink for mopping to homeowners in order to keep their costs and thus homeowner fees down. I suppose in a city where space is so tight, that 17-square foot slop sink room could be worth big bucks to most people.

image via Lexington, MA Historic Survey

The Five Fields Community in Lexington, Massachusetts. I knew nothing of this modernist neighborhood spearheaded by a group of architects that included Walter Gropius. The philosophy behind the shared common areas reminded me so much of Randall Arendt’s work.  By the way, I think it sucks that the Boston Globe won’t let anyone read one measly article per month online without subscribing, so I apologize that you won’t be able to read the whole thing without signing up for 99 cents, but this article by Linda Matchan is worth it, I promise.

Photos by photographer Léo Caillard and photo retoucher Alexis Persani

Classical sculptures dressed as hipsters. Thanks so much to my friend Paola Thomas of Mirror Mirror for bringing this to my attention!

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