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Fresh New Design

Friday, May 31st, 2013

Magis Is On Sale!

DesignPublic.com

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Hey All! Now through June 10, save 15% on all pieces from Magis! This is great news for those of you who are looking to add some bright color to your screened-in porch like I am (or your deck, or your patio, or your dining room or desk…) I choose these amazing Folding Air Armchairs in grasshopper green myself:

The Magis Chair One with 4 Star Base adds some mad geometry to any space. I think it would be extra cool in a Buckminster Filler-designed geodesic dome, but how many of us have those? I’ll put it in my funky cottage, thank you very much.

By the way, this chair also comes with concrete base and four legged base style options.

I don’t have a pool, but I’d pretend I did and just lounge in this beauty underneath the sprinkler. The Magis Paso Doble Chaise Lounge‘s  sexy curves would distract me from my sad, pool-less situation.

Need a spot to rest that pitcher of refreshing mojitos? Look no further, the Magis One Bistro Table is here, just waiting for you to order it up and perch your cocktails atop it.

Moving indoors, Magis Steelwood Shelving Systems have a gorgeous contemporary look that will hold everything without clunking up a room. Use it for media, office tomes and binders, books, kitchen stuff. It’s also great for people who like to keep things folded and stacked in the closet.

So peeps, get on it, because this sale is only through June 10, 2013.

Shop The Sale

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Thursday, August 30th, 2012

The New Classics: Predicting Iconic Furniture for 2050

Becky

Posted by Becky | View all posts by Becky
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I ate up the cover story on The New York Times’ Home Section today; “The Classics, Circa 2050.” For one thing, I’m always trying to determine what the new classics are (i.e. new furniture that will eventually gain icon status, today’s equivalent of a mid-century icon like a Wegner Wishbone Chair or an Eames Shell Chair). Beyond aesthetics and one’s own judgement, a sign that a piece may be well on its way to icon status is if it’s a part of a museum’s collection. Another when prominent architects choose to use it in their own homes.

Anyway, I was very pleased to see a handful of my favorite products that Design Public carries made the cut. Here they are:

The Louis Ghost Chair by Philippe Starck for Kartell (this probably inspired the most discussion)

The Emeco Navy Chair already had mid-century icon status in my book, now the experts are choosing the latest version, made from 111 recycled plastic bottles, the 111 Navy Chair.

Kartell scored again, with their Bourgie Lamp by Ferruccio Laviani

Vitra’s Algue made the cut

Tod Boontje’s Until Dawn Curtain made the cut, we love the way his botanical cuts look on the Midsummer Light

There were a few others I would have added to the list:

Sori Yanagi’s Butterfly Stool, manufactured by Vitra

The Coral 600 Pendant Lamp by David Trubridge

Bend Seating Lucy by Gaurav Nanda

Blu Dot Modulicious Case Goods

Nobody asked me, by the way! But I’m asking you – Which recent furniture and accessories do you think will achieve icon status in 30 years? Keep in mind the process can involve becoming unpopular or passé for a decade or three and then re-appreciated later. Personally, I have trouble looking beyond chairs and lighting most of the time.

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Thursday, August 9th, 2012

Designer Interview: Debra Folz Design

Becky

Posted by Becky | View all posts by Becky
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Today we’re sitting down with Debra Folz of Debra Folz Designs, learning a bit more about her studio, her work and what inspires her.

Please tell us a bit about the path that led you to where you are today.

I look to industrial materials to act as a canvas for domestic embelishment in a way to modernize a traditional craft, and also present it as an embedded and integral part of the object.  I enjoy the blank nature of industrial sheet materials and investing the quality and quantity of time to create something that is one-of-a-kind.  Other times it can be a desire to soften surfaces or explore geometries created by the combination of hard and soft materials.  I am consistently working with ideas of hard versus soft, industrial versus domestic and traditional versus contemporary processes.  I enjoy the tension of working between these ideas and finding the spaces between.

What makes you want to make things go “askew”? How does that change our perception of the object or the space?

That is such a great question that no one has ever asked me :)  It’s only at the point that you’ve make several objects that you can look back and start to see connections you hadn’t anticipated.  Drawing from work such as The Whole Story, Askew Shelves, and Askew Carpet, I am intrigued by the idea of an object appearing to have a relationship to a specific environment / surface.  Because the pieces are interdependent from the space in some way, it makes them feel more integral to that space.  I also enjoy the idea of reconsidering the way we approach objects and arrange our spaces.

Please tell us a bit about your studio in the South End. What’s the ‘hood like?

My studio is in a large artist building which has served as a great way to introduce my work though open studios and the SOWA Sundays in the summer.  On a typical day I will chat with some of my wonderful neighbors, get a visit from the adorable cocker spaniel down the hall, and enjoy coffee and lunch at the Mohr McPherson Cafe downstairs.  I am able to walk to the studio from home, and you can’t throw a rock without hitting a great place to meet a friend for an after work-cocktail/ dinner.

How does your space/neighborhood inspire your work? Where else do you look for inspiration?

Inspiration for me comes from many different places: Observing the way we use objects, experimenting with materials both old and new, incorporating textile and embroidery techniques, etc.  However I especially enjoy opportunities to learn traditional manufacturing processes and imagining their adaptation to more modern objects.

Your business is taking off quickly! What’s next?

I’m currently working on developing a small gift line, expanding the first production collection recently exhibited at ICFF (available on Design Public) and working through some potential ideas for my next studio collection/ limited edition work.  I enjoy working concurrently in these markets, as I find the ideas can bounce between and inform each other.  Beyond [all] that, who knows … the unexpected opportunities that pop up can be the most exciting!

We’re looking forward to seeing what pops up! Thanks so much to Debra Folz for chatting with us today.

SHOP DEBRA FOLZ

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Tuesday, June 5th, 2012

Designer Interview: Evan Stoller of Stoller Works

Becky

Posted by Becky | View all posts by Becky
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Today I had the pleasure of getting to know more about Evan Stoller of Stoller Works. I sent him a list of questions and he answered me with a the fascinating story of his career path and all of these beautiful photographs. Take it away Evan!

Stoller with his Rail Table

My mother was a painter and my father photographed modern architecture. Modernism was kind of a religion in our home. Living with the works of family friends such as the Eameses, George Nakashima and Alexander Calder was an education in design.

After studying architecture at Pratt Institute I began doing sculpture in NYC. My friends and I rented an abandoned cheese factory in what was to become Tribeca. For five years I had a fabulous skylit studio and produced a series of animal sculptures that culminated in a 9’ x 9’ frog that was designed to jump in the rain. To me, The Frog was my first real-world study in architecture. Organic systems were interpreted, organized and overlaid within an aluminum and spring steel skeletal system. The concept of a moving animal developed along an architectonic path of questions and creative solutions.

Stoller’s Frog Sculpture
My wife Phyllis and I moved out of the city to an abandoned airport, and then to a disused gas station. I began making larger sculptures that were influenced by the lattice construction of cranes and the structural purity of bridges. I completed works that appeared more functional – things that looked like organic lifting devices and sculptures such as ‘Ramp’:
Ramp
‘Ramp’ is a 30’ long incline topped with asphalt. I called them ‘standing structures’ and they developed from, and as an expression of, the environment in which they were displayed. Some stood on long skids for optimal ground support or had pod-like feet to resist sinking into the turf. My sculptures were becoming supporting structures, close relatives of the tables I’m doing now. I completed a huge environmental sculpture in NYC that brought me back into the world of architecture. ‘Maya Station’ was an array of 40’ tension trusses spanning six 20’ tall towers and 10’ tall gates. My inspiration were the forms and spaces of a Mayan city. The sculpture defined an environment on an architectural scale, and after it’s completion I became an architect.

Maya Station

Architectural commissions are a real ‘through the looking glass’ experience. The thrill and complexity of architecture is always a voyage through the unexplored, an arduous but incredible experience. We built our own home  and I began designing a series of houses, studios and more recently a medical clinic and a theater.

Stoller’s Home

A painting studio by Stoller

My most recent sculpture seems like both an architectural model and a huge piece of exterior furniture. ‘Hudson Ecliptic’ is a modular 40′ diameter circular form that floats over rough terrain. It’s constructed from 120 cellular units that each display a tiny painting. Seeming like a chain of galleries, the sculpture becomes a miniature museum.

Hudson Ecliptic

Stoller Works furniture started as custom pieces for architectural clients. I strive to express structural clarity and demonstrate an efficiency of of materials and fabrication. Working with big beams I invented a system to reinforce thin beam slices with tension rods and bolt them into extremely strong and rigid trestle assemblies. With remainders of deep rolled structural sections I make standing desks and podium tables.

Stoller Works Yellow Frame Standing Desk

My tables combine high-tech trestle structures with the warm surface of wood tabletops. We use walnut and ash from known sources and avoid the use of pollutants in manufacturing our products. All our plywood is FSC certified and coated with UV-cured finishes.

Stoller Works Station Table

Stoller Works Foundation Beam Coffee Table

Stoller Works City Desk

Stoller Works Podium Table

Thanks so much to Evan Stoller for taking the time to share his work with us today. Shop all Stoller Works tables and desks here.

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Wednesday, May 9th, 2012

Hot Design in Action: Wall Flats at Home

Becky

Posted by Becky | View all posts by Becky
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Thanks to everyone who has been posting their Design Public goodies in action around their own homes. I love these so much more than retail product shots; it shows how talented you all are and I’m nosy; I love getting a peek into your homes and lives this way. Here are a few ways you all are using Inhabit’s Wall Flats that caught my eye this week:

These Inhabit Wall Flats were posted by Lisa Choules, and because she posted this picture, I am suffering from an acute case of kitchen envy! So clean and white, full of style, and punched with color and mid-mod style in all the right ways. On the far left wall you can see the Drift Wall Flats adding just the right amount of texture, the perfect backdrop for her Nelson Pendant Lamp and Eames Eiffel Base Shell Chairs. Bravo!

Next we have this super hip and energetic nursery posted by Lori, who has used Seesaw Wall Flats to add dimension to the white wall in the room. I love the way she’s balanced white, hardwood floors and that brilliant green, and the birch trees are the perfect finishing touch. Isn’t it amazing how far nursery design has come in the past decade? Babies are growing up hipper than ever!

Want to explore all of the cool Wall Flats designs? Check them out here. Check out all of the Hot Design in Action here.  Want to share your own hot design in action? We don’t ask this without offering up a little enticement: Email us a photo of design in your home and get $10 off your next order. If your photo includes you or a friend in the shot you’ll be entered to win a monthly drawing for a $200 gift certificate!

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